Tag Archives: Photography

Cover Picture

In the last post I showed a sketch I did on site (in gale force winds) overlaid onto an image I took of what I was sketching ( a herd of bison on the Little Missouri River in Theodore Roosevelt National Park). I was contacted by the folks that created the above publication. They asked if they could use it for an article on TRNP. They decided to use it on the cover instead of the inside.

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Filed under Bandlands, Outdoors, Photography

Between Storms

dec5_2016_lrwp

Up to this point we’ve had 29 inches of snow in seven days. As I was finishing up shoveling snow from the driveway last night, the sky opened up for a brief 30 seconds giving us this light show. Back to reality—We are in the midst of a full-blown blizzard with no travel advised and all schools and government offices closed. Wind is gusting to 50 mph and wind chills are well below zero. A poem I saw recently on the Writer’s Almanac that I thought fit this image.

I’ll tell you how the Sun rose…

I’ll tell you how the Sun rose —
A Ribbon at a time —
The Steeples swam in Amethyst —
The news, like Squirrels, ran —
The Hills untied their Bonnets —
The Bobolinks — begun —
Then I said softly to myself —
“That must have been the Sun”!
But how he set — I know not —
There seemed a purple stile
That little Yellow boys and girls
Were climbing all the while —
Till when they reached the other side,
A Dominie in Gray —
Put gently up the evening Bars —
And led the flock away —

“I’ll tell you how the Sun rose…” by Emily Dickinson. Public Domain.

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Filed under Photography

Wet Plate Photography: A Glimpse of the Past in Real Time

Shane Blakowitsch, proprietor of Nostalgic Glass, exposes a glass plate with an 8 second exposer.

Shane Blakowitsch, proprietor of Nostalgic Glass, exposes a glass plate with an 8 second exposer.

Recently my colleagues and advanced design students had an opportunity to take part in a wet plate ambrotype photo shoot at Nostalgic Glass Studio, proprietor Shane Blakowitsch. As Shane explains on his web site, wet plate collodion photography is the earliest form of photography. Most of the Civil War photography we’ve seen over the years was wet plate photography.

The bellows camera Shane used to take 5x7 glass impressions.

The bellows camera Shane used to take 5×7 glass impressions.

The camera above is a bellows camera meaning, the bellows go in or out to focus the subject. The exposure time Shane used was 8 seconds. Because of long exposure, the subject needs to be perfectly still. Notice on some of the images with the models, a metal pronged stand is set up behind (out of the cameras view) the sitting subjects to keep the sitter from moving.

Smile Jared.

Smile Jared.

Bright lights and no blinking are needed for a good exposure.

Bright lights and no blinking are needed for a good exposure.

Shane leaning on the metal prop that keeps subjects from moving.

Shane leaning on the metal prop that keeps subjects from moving.

Plate One from  our outing.

Plate One from our outing.

Plate two from our outing.

Plate two from our outing.

One of Shane's Images on the cover of View Camera magazine.

One of Shane’s Images on the cover of View Camera magazine.

Shane worked with a Custer impersonator to recreate the iconic image taken by  Matthew Brady. This image is on the cover of the current issue of  View Camera magazine.

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Filed under Bismarck State College, Graphic Design, Photography